Author Archives: Teresa Stockton

Bone Up to Fight Osteoporosis

Primary osteoporosis is the name given to osteoporosis cases not caused by an underlying drug reaction, disease or syndrome. In this condition, the bones—the word itself means “porous bones”—become brittle, making them highly susceptible to fracture. An event as innocuous as landing the wrong way when sitting down on a chair or twisting awkwardly during […]

Regaining Your Energy After Surgery

Surgery can take a major toll on your body, not just for the obvious reasons. Even a minor surgical procedure requires your body to heal, expending energy and invoking immune responses that can tax your musculoskeletal and cardiopulmonary systems. The more intensive the procedure, the more difficult your recovery may be. Spending time in the […]

Watch for Wrist Pain After an Injury

If you have taken a fall on an outstretched hand with the palm facing down, you might have injured the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC). The TFCC provides stability to the wrist bones, acts as a shock absorber and helps the wrist to move. Gymnasts, athletes and those with repetitive strong forces on the wrist are […]

Working Out with Exercise-induced Asthma

Another name for exercise-induced asthma (EIA)—exercise-induced bronchoconstriction—is more descriptive of what your condition actually involves: The passages that carry air into and out of your lungs become constricted when you exercise, resulting in asthma symptoms, such as wheezing, coughing, shortness of breath and chest tightness. These symptoms do not necessarily occur during exercise but usually […]

Born to Run Farther

As the days get longer, you may consider adding distance to your runs. What kind of plan should you follow to run farther and increase your endurance but to do so safely and prevent injury? The first rule to remember is that if you find it too difficult to complete a new distance level, do […]

Does Mono Mean No Exercise?

Mononucleosis—often known simply as “mono”—has an incubation period of one to two months. Once symptoms appear, recovery can take an additional four to six weeks. Until your physician tells you it is safe to resume more strenuous workouts, avoid any but the mildest exercise (e.g., short walks). In many mono patients, the spleen—a large blood-filtering […]

Pedaling Your Way to Health

You probably remember learning how to ride a bike. But most likely, your six-year-old self had no clue just how beneficial this newly acquired skill could be to your overall health and wellness. One of the most popular and enjoyable fitness activities, cycling was recently celebrated in the medical community for enhancing cardiac health, thanks […]

Getting Your Ankle Off on the Right Foot Again

Almost everyone has heard of total hip replacement and total knee replacement. But fewer people are familiar with total ankle replacement (also called total ankle arthroplasty). Although the ankle looks like a simple hinge joint, it actually involves much more complex movement, absorbing forces up to five times body weight. Many conditions, such as severe […]

Bracing for a New Arthritis Treatment

Knee pain from osteoarthritis is no walk in the park. In fact, the pain probably keeps you from walks in the park. Could wearing a knee brace help you overcome this discomfort? Often, arthritis affects only one compartment of the knee. This can result in your lower leg angling awkwardly and appearing “bow legged” (varus) […]

Returning to Action After Biceps Tenodesis

The biceps tendon runs from the biceps muscle through the rotator cuff and into the shoulder joint, where it then attaches to the socket. If the biceps tendon becomes inflamed or irritated, a condition called bicep tendinopathy, you may need to undergo surgery called biceps tenodesis to relieve the discomfort. Overuse of the tendon from […]